When artists are looking for different flavors to flesh out their arrangements, you end up hearing some strange stuff that gets the call to service...

The Slide Whistle: Used to great effect on Bob Dylan's "Highway 61 Revisited" (1965). It's not just for pratfalls anymore! Sadly missed on Johnny Winter's cover, though...

The Theremin: The most important contribution to the tail end of The Beach Boys' fantastic "Good Vibrations" (1966). Maybe the best use ever for the signature staple sound of any decent 1950's sci-fi cheese-fest...

The Melodica: You know, that dopey looking keyboard you blow into. Hooters made this part of their overall sound, most notably on "And We Danced" (1985), proving that you could really rock out, even if you were playing a toy...

The Kazoo: Harry Nilsson provided the "toilet-paper-thru-a-comb" buzzing for Ringo's classic cover of "You're Sixteen" (1973). Hey, that's Princess Leia as the teen girl in the video!

The Oboe: One of the smallest sized instruments you can find in a symphony orchestra takes over where synthesizers dread to go, courtesy of Roxy Music's "Out Of The Blue" (1974). This line-up of the band also featured keyboardist Eddie Jobson doubling on a made-of-who-knows-what violin that you could actually see through!

The Chainsaw: Okay, technically not an instrument, but that didn't stop Jackyl singer Jesse James Dupree from wielding it oh-so-melodically on "The Lumberjack" (1992). Also noteworthy for providing one of A-to-Z's most bizarre segues as it was followed immediately by Monty Python's "The Lumberjack Song". Touche!

The Bagpipe: The undisputed champion of the most unlikely combo ever, we say how about a 21-gun salute for 1975's "It's A Long Way To The Top (If You Wanna Rock 'N' Roll)" by AC/DC. Crushes every time!

Any we've missed? Ocarina and sitar fans, please, hit us up...