The numbers are one thing - 33 career playoff victories, more than all but four NFL franchises...six Super Bowl titles, tied with Bill Belichick for the most by any player or coach in league history - but it's the context of the 2020 NFL season that may make this run Brady's best yet.

He left New England in March, the team he'd been with for 20 years and helped guide to 13 Conference Championship Games while building the greatest dynasty the game had ever seen. And he left them to join the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the team with the worst winning percentage in NFL history entering this season.

In the span of one year, the dynastic Patriots went from 12-4 to 7-9, snapping the franchise's league record of 11-straight postseason appearances while also suffering the team's first losing season since 2000.

Meanwhile, Brady took the Bucs from 7-9 to a team that currently has 14 wins and is set to become the first team to ever "host" a Super Bowl when they square off vs. Patrick Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs in two weeks' time.

Whether you love him (like I do, and any reasonable Patriots' fan should as well) or root against him since his defection to the Sunshine State, there's no arguing his legacy and greatness. The man has surpassed the accomplishments of any other QB to such an extent that his status as the G.O.A.T. is cemented in history.

He's now in such rare air that the only conversations left to be had are whether he's "the greatest team sports athlete of all-time," the "greatest winner of winner of all-time," and of course, Brady vs. Belichick.

ESPN's Mike Reiss, a man that covered Tom Brady for the entirety of the legendary Qb's career (until this season) joined The Drive on Monday as TB12 gets set to play in a 4th Super Bowl in the last five seasons.

Mike Reiss via Twitter