Neil Young's music may be gone from Spotify, but the musician hasn't had his last say. But rather than add to the discourse over Joe Rogan's podcast, his primary target is Spotify's CEO Daniel Ek.

Young posted a new open letter via his Neil Young's Archives website where he once again cited his concern over disinformation and those who misinform. While initially speaking about "climate chaos" and the problems with fossil fuel and those who fund it, the singer then turned his attention to the "creators" in the world, once again lobbying against Spotify.

"To the musicians and creators in the world, I say this: You must be able to find a better place than SPOTIFY to be the home of your art," stated Young, then turning his attention to those who work for the company.

"To the workers at SPOTIFY, I say Daniel Ek is your big problem - not Joe Rogan. Ek pulls the strings. Get out of that place before it eats up your soul. The only goals stated by EK are about numbers - not art, not creativity."

Young's full letter can be viewed below:

In our communication age, disinformation is the problem. Ditch the misinformers. Find a good clean place to support with your monthly checks. You have the real power. Use it.

To the baby boomers, I say 70 percent of the country’s financial assets are in your hands compared with just about 5 percent for millennials. You and I need to lead.

In our age of Climate Chaos, I say ditch the companies contributing to the mass fossil fuel destruction of Earth.

For their continued funding of the fossil fuel damage even as the global temperature keeps climbing, I say take your money from the accounts of these American banks today:

Chase
Citi
Bank of America
Wells Fargo

Join me as I move my money away from the damage causers or you will unintentionally be one of them. You have the power to change the world. We can do it together. Your grandchildren will thank you in history.

To the musicians and creators in the world, I say this:
You must be able to find a better place than SPOTIFY to be the home of your art.

To the workers at SPOTIFY, I say Daniel Ek is your big problem - not Joe Rogan. Ek pulls the strings.
Get out of that place before it eats up your soul. The only goals stated by EK are about numbers - not art, not creativity.
Notice that EK never mentions the Medical Professionals who started this conversation. Look, one last time - at the statements EK has made.

Then be free and take the good path.

Young's initial beef with Spotify started with the musician issuing an ultimatum to the company, calling out his concern over the spread of "fake information" concerning vaccines and then citing the Joe Rogan Experience podcast. "They can have [Joe] Rogan or Young. Not both," stated Young.

Spotify then complied with Young's request, but other artists have since followed Young's lead with Graham Nash, Stephen Stills and David Crosby, Nils Lofgren, India.Arie, Failure and Joni Mitchell among the acts who have since requested the removal of their music from the streaming service.

In the aftermath of the controversy, Rogan posted on social media stating that he "doesn't always get it right" on his podcast and that he vowed to "do better." He added, "These podcasts are very strange because they're just conversations. And oftentimes I have no idea what I'm going to talk about until I sit down and talk to people. And that's why some of my ideas are not that prepared or fleshed out because I'm literally having them in real-time, but I do my best, and they're just conversations."

He then thanked Spotify for their continued backing, and added, "I'm not a doctor. I'm not a scientist. I'm just a person who sits down and talks to people and has conversations with them. Do I get things wrong? Absolutely. I get things wrong, but I try to correct them whenever I get something wrong. I try to correct it because I'm interested in telling the truth."

After exiting Spotify, Young partnered with Amazon Music to house his music for streaming purposes.

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