Meet Mr. Statistics... -- Suggestive Stones single? C'mon now! -- A hep-cat from Lewiston, Maine that you oughtta know about...

What happens when The Rolling Stones arrive at the Sydney airport, Jan. 1965. (Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

6/6/1960 (58 years ago today) - File under "No, we're not kidding!": Old school crooner and questionable father figure Bing Crosby is presented with a Platinum disc to commemorate his {get this} 200 millionth record sold!!! True that, and yikes! The sales figures were based on a combined total of 2,600 recorded singles and 125 albums (read that again, it's reasonably astounding) -- Dah Binger's global lifetime sales on 179 different labels in 28 countries totaled 400 million records, so it looks like everybody gets some orange juice this morning...

6/6/1965 (53 years ago today) - My dad absolutely loved this song and quoted it quite often: The Rolling Stones released "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" on this date, three of the greatest minutes ever recorded in the history of the universe and deservedly becoming the band's very first No. 1 single -- This is weird: it wasn't released as a 45 in their homeland, though, until a year later (August, 1966 actually) and even then it was (initially) only aired on pirate radio stations because of its "sexually explicit and suggestive" lyrics. "Hey, hey, hey!" indeed...

6/6/1944 - Lookee here, he was born in Lewiston, Maine(!!!) on this date: Clarence White was a very talented bluegrass-country guitarist and singer, a member of the legendary bluegrass group The Kentucky Colonels, but was probably most famous for his stint with The Byrds (from 1968 to 1973) -- As a much-sought-after session musician, he played on records by Linda Ronstadt, The Monkees, Randy Newman, The Everly Brothers, Joe Cocker, Arlo Guthrie, Jackson Browne and lots more! -- As if that wasn't cool enough, Clarence is also credited (with frequent collaborator Gene Parsons) for inventing the B-bender, a guitar accessory enabling the player to mechanically bend the B-string up a whole tone to create the sound of a pedal steel guitar -- Tragically, Clarence died on July 14, 1973, after being struck by a drunk driver while he and his brother were loading equipment into their car following a Kentucky Colonels reunion gig in Palmdale, California. He was only 29 years old.

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"...I try and I try and I try and I try...", xoxo!