The Clash salute Elvis, or at least rip him off... -- Fogerty back in classic form... -- The one guy The Rolling Stones couldn't do without...

(Courtesy of RCA Records)

3/23/1956 (62 years ago today) - Game-changer, without question: Elvis Presley released his self-titled debut studio album in beautiful mono sound on the RCA Victor record label -- The album became the very first rock 'n' roll LP to make it to the No. 1 spot on the Billboard chart, a position it held for the next ten weeks in a row -- It was also the first rock record to achieve sales of over one million copies, a fantastic feat for its time, boasting a ridiculously-more-than-solid track listing: "Blue Suede Shoes", "I Got A Woman", "Blue Moon", "Money Honey", "Just Because", 12 songs all together, none of 'em longer than the necessary two-and-a-half-minutes. The iconic cover photograph was taken at the Fort Homer Hesterly Armory in Tampa, Florida, on July 31, 1955. The Clash were ready to pounce...

3/23/1985 (33 years ago today) - John Fogerty finally gets his post-Creedence Clearwater Revival career back on track when his third solo album "Centerfield" goes to No. 1 -- It had been close to ten years since John had last released any new material, and for this one he took complete artistic control: not only did he write all the songs, but he sang all the vocals and played all the instruments himself! Led by the classic radio hits "The Old Man Down The Road", "Rock and Roll Girls" and the title track, the album went Top Ten around the world, racking up almost three million in sales...

3/23/1942 - Born on this day in New York, musician and record producer Jimmy Miller, who was at the helm for dozens of (now classic) rock albums including the one and only Blind Faith LP (with Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood), as well as landmark recordings by Spooky Tooth, Traffic, Motorhead and The Plasmatics -- Jimmy is best known, however, for his association with The Rolling Stones during their truly legendary burst of singles and albums that established them as The World's Greatest Rock And Roll Band, acting as the de facto guiding-light/knob-twiddler-extraordinaire for that incredible/unmatched run, starting with "Beggar's Banquet" (1968) and "Let It Bleed" (1969), and into the '70's with "Sticky Fingers" (1971), "Exile On Main Street" (1972) and "Goats Head Soup" (1973). Mr. Jimmy was only 52 years old when he passed away from liver failure on October 22, 1944.

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