I don't spend a ton of time in Rochester just because I live in Portsmouth and work in Dover so all of my stores and hot spots tend to be in that radius. However, I volunteered to help with a recent mission for an awesome organization called Grandly Rochester so I drove there the other day after the show. As I was driving down North Main Street, I spotted this upside down sign. I craned my neck to read it and saw it said "Fox Ridge Outfitters". If you are a resident of the Lilac City you know what I am talking about. But for everyone else, this is what I am referring to:

Kira Lew

The next day at work I asked my dear friend and fellow broadcaster Aaron, aka Train, about it. I know Chio lives in Rochester too but he is relatively new to the area. Aaron has called the Seacoast home for all of his years on this planet and I knew he would be able to tell me the history and origin of this silly sign. Here's Aaron (the one in the middle)

Here is how our conversation went:

Kira: Hey! What's the deal with that upside down sign in Rochester? I drove by it on my way back from the old Ben Franklin.

Aaron: OH! That sign has been upside down for as long as I can remember!

Kira: Was it ever right side up?

Aaron: YES! I had an event there in 2005 when Fox Ridge was still open and it was right side up. But ever since it closed it has been upside down.

Kira: Interesting...

Aaron: And you know what's even more interesting is Coyote Creek Outfitters opened up two miles down the road and basically has the same stuff that Fox Ridge had. I wonder if it is owned by the same company?

Kira: I have no idea. But someone should take down that upside down sign.

And Scene.

So my question still remains. WHAT IS THE DEAL (said like Jerry Seinfeld) with the upside down sign in Rochester? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

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Every beach town has its share of pluses and minuses, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best one to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, that compares U.S. beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The cities ranged in population from 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From those rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will be unsurprised to learn that many of towns featured here are in one of those two states.

Keep reading to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.